Month: September 2015

The Foolishness of “Getting Even”

Theresa Wilson was a woman scorned. When she went to see her ex-boyfriend, she found him with another woman!

Nobody likes to be rejected. Nobody likes the feeling of humiliation and injury that comes of the experience. We human beings have feelings and don’t appreciate having them stomped and betrayed. Ms. Wilson is no exception. So she had a few choice words for him and stormed out – still seething with anger.

It was only about an hour later that she spotted him driving on the street in front of her. So she put her frustration in action and rammed his car. Not once but twice. After the second slam, she had forced the car off the road. Only when the driver got out and started toward her did she realize her mistake. Oops! It wasn’t the former boyfriend. It was a confused fellow driving a car similar to his.

For her out-of-control assault on an unsuspecting and innocent driver, Ms. Wilson was arrested by state troopers on charges of vehicular assault. She not only learned that several different makes of compact cars look very much alike but that revenge is seldom as sweet as it looks from a distance.

Before we are too harsh with an angry woman bent on getting even, maybe the rest of us need to ask ourselves a few questions: How prone am I to harbor a grudge? How inclined to get even when wronged? How quick to take offense?

There is a line near the end of Camelot that stuck in my mind the first time I heard it. As King Arthur surveys the ruin and carnage of war, he looks forlornly over the landscape and laments that revenge is “the most worthless of causes.”

Countless wars have been fought to avenge tarnished honor. Friendships have been destroyed, marriages broken, and children set against parents for this most worthless of causes. Simply because it leads to such terrible outcomes, most of the great ethical teachers across the centuries have rebuked the urge to retaliate. Jesus not only taught his followers to let offenses pass – to turn the other cheek – but to forgive our enemies. He said to return good for evil.

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If you have suffered some slight that is haunting you still and tempting you to get even, you might reflect on Theresa Wilson’s experience. Is the pettiness of revenge any less if you ram the right car? Hurt the person you intended to injure? Or does retaliation simply diminish you and reveal your lack of character?

Revenge is never really about getting even. To the contrary, it is always a form of falling below another. Only forgiveness allows you to rise above.

– Rubel Shelly

Anti-Inflammatory Diet – The Top 10 Tips

Chronic inflammation is one of they key reasons why people experience ongoing pain, and, unfortunately, it’s also incredibly common.

– Jesse Canone

While acute inflammation helps your body to heal (after an injury, for instance), chronic inflammation contributes to diseases ranging from heart disease and cancer to rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. As mentioned, it’s also often implicated in pain.

What causes chronic inflammation?

Stress and exposure to environmental toxins (like pollution or household chemicals) certainly contribute, but what you put in your body — your food and drinks, for instance — also play a major role.

Because of this, a comprehensive anti-inflammatory diet, consisting of inflammation-fighting food, drinks and herbal supplements — is an invaluable tool to help keep this pervasive health threat at bay.

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A Comprehensive Anti-Inflammatory Diet in 10 Easy Steps

Food and Drinks

10. Fermented Foods

If you like the tangy flavor of traditionally fermented foods like kefir, sauerkraut and kimchi, you’re in luck, because these foods are an excellent source of beneficial bacteria known as probiotics. These good bacteria help to curb systemic inflammation in your body.[i]

Kefir, a fermented milk drink, in particular, contains not only probiotics but also anti-inflammatory prebiotics.[ii]

9. Tart Cherries

A glass of tart cherry juice a day may help keep the doctor away … that’s because tart cherries contain inflammation-fighting antioxidants known as anthocyanins. Tart cherries have been found to reduce numerous biomarkers of inflammation, including inflammation of abdominal fat, plasma and the heart.[iii]

anti-inflammatory diet8. Blueberries

These unassuming nutritional powerhouses also contain antioxidants that offer a protective effect against inflammation. In fact, by adding blueberries to your morning smoothie (or simply eating them by the handful) daily for six weeks, you can increase anti-inflammatory molecules known as cytokines in your body![iv]

7. Broccoli

There’s a reason your mom always told you to eat your broccoli, and one of them has to do with the phytonutrients, such as sulphoraphane, that it contains. Sulphoraphane helps prevent the activation of inflammatory enzymes in your body in a way similar to anti-inflammatory drugs, but even better it also helps to keep inflammatory enzymes from increasing.[v]

6. Green Tea

Sipping on green tea is an excellent way to get more anti-inflammatory flavonoids into your diet. These natural compounds increase beneficial anti-inflammatory substances and decrease inflammatory ones,[vi] making green tea an ideal addition to your anti-inflammatory diet.

5. Nuts

If you want to naturally lower your risk of dying from an inflammatory disease, eat more nuts. These tasty snacks contain antioxidants, omega-3 fats, L-arginine and magnesium, which work together to modulate inflammation in your body.[vii]

Top Anti-Inflammatory Herbs and Enzymes

anti-inflammatory diet4. Ginger

Whether steeped in tea or grated over your stir-fry, ginger has potent anti-inflammatory benefits, and actually shares pharmacological properties with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (without all of the side effects).[viii]

3. Boswellia (Indian Frankincense)

Boswellia, a natural inflammation-fighting gum resin extract derived from the Boswellia serrata tree, common to India, fights inflammation as well as most NSAID drugs, but without the stomach irritation or ulceration. Its benefits are due to a mixture of naturally occurring organic acids, which inhibit pain and inflammation-causing enzymes.

2. Turmeric

The yellow spice most well-known for its use in Indian curry dishes, turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory. Curcumin, its active ingredient, has been shown to work as well as ibuprofen in treating pain, such as that from knee osteoarthritis.[ix]

1. Proteolytic Enzymes

Proteolytic enzymes, or proteases, are different from, say, digestive enzymes, because they enter your circulatory system and work throughout your entire body. They are “systemic” enzymes with a number of important purposes, including breaking down excess fibrin, a natural substance that helps your body with wound healing, but which often builds up in your body, causing additional inflammation and pain.

– See more at: http://www.losethebackpain.com/blog/2013/01/07/anti-inflammatory-diet/#sthash.5FQBibez.dpuf

Source: Anti-Inflammatory Diet – The Top 10 Tips

Depression Colors The Way We See The World

Our feelings, our moods can, quite literally, color our world — particularly in the case of depression.

New research published last week in the journal Psychological Science finds that sadness can affect our vision, making the world appear more gray, by impairing the neural processes involved in color perception.

As it turns out, there’s a reason we use colors as a metaphor for emotion, with expressions like “feeling blue” or having a “gray day.”

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“It was interesting that we have so many metaphors that link emotion and color perception,” Christopher Thorstenson, a psychology researcher at the University of Rochester and the study’s lead author, told The Huffington Post in an email. “We were curious whether there really was a link between sadness and how people see color.”

To answer this question, the researchers asked 127 undergraduates to watch either a sad or funny video. Then, the students viewed 48 color swatches — which were desaturated to the point of being almost gray — and tried to identify them as red, yellow, green or blue. Those who had watched the sad clip were less accurate in identifying colors than the students who watched the funny clip, suggesting that they were perceiving less of the color.

The findings build on previous research that investigated the link between mood and perception. Other studies found that when people have a goal to reach or an object to attain — such as the finish line of a race — they may perceive that object to be larger than it really is. People experiencing fear, on the other hand, may perceive certain things in their environment — such as faces with negative expressions — as more threatening than they actually are.

This is because our emotions carry information about the value of objects, and that information is incorporated into the visual perception of our environment. The brain’s emotional and perceptual systems don’t seem to be completely distinct from one another, as was previously believed, but instead engage in a dynamic interplay.

“Psychologists have tacitly viewed perception, cognition, emotion, and other basic processes as separable phenomena to be studied in isolation,” psychologists Jonathan Zadra and Gerald Clore wrote in a 2011 review of studies on emotion and perception. “Increasingly, however, we are coming to see relevant areas of the brain and the processes they support as highly interactive.”

* Taken from Huffpost Science

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